SECRET SERVICE OPENS VAULT: ‘Never-before-seen’ 9/11 pics released

Wednesday - 08/09/2021 13:40
New images of the September 11 attacks have been released from Secret Service “employees” ahead of the 20th anniversary as Joe Biden makes a major move. Warning: Distressing

The US Secret Service has released unseen pictures of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks for the first time as the country prepares for the 20th anniversary and FBI insiders reveal more details about the horrifying day.

This week, the Secret Service announced it will be sharing photos “from that day and the days that followed”, some that “have never been seen” before.

Among the images released so far include a photo taken by a Secret Service “employee” of the Twin Towers at the World Trade Centre up in flames and billowing smoke after being struck by both planes.
 

 

Another sees a hazy Ground Zero after the collapse of the Twin Towers with what appears to be a sole medic in the foreground, shielding his face from the debris.

“I always say it reminded me of a monster movie from when I was a kid, like a dinosaur or some ... creature was chasing people up Broadway,” FBI Special Agent “J.A.” revealed.

Special Agent “J.A.” was working on a truck hijacking squad in Brooklyn-Queens and was attending a meeting for hostage negotiators in New York City on September 11. He subsequently led the investigation of two suspected co-conspirators in the weeks that followed.

“When I went out to Broadway and started looking south I saw ... this is not going to be good,” he said.

More images are expected to be released as the anniversary fast approaches, as US President Joe Biden announced an executive order to oversee a “declassification review” of documents related to the FBI’s September 11th investigations.

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 Keywords: United States

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