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Serena Williams husband Alexis Ohanian coldly attacks New York Times

Tuesday - 18/09/2018 02:26
AN investigation into sexism in professional tennis has attracted the wrath of Serena Williams’ husband, who has fired both barrels at the New York Times.
Naomi Osaka of Japan (L) stands with Serena Williams of the US during their Women's Singles Finals match at the 2018 US Open. Picture: Timothy A. Clary/AFPSource:AFP
Naomi Osaka of Japan (L) stands with Serena Williams of the US during their Women's Singles Finals match at the 2018 US Open. Picture: Timothy A. Clary/AFPSource:AFP

SERENA Williams’s husband Alexis Ohanian angrily hit out at a New York Times report that clashed with Williams’ argument of unfair treatment towards female tennis players. 

Williams’ heated argument with chair umpire Carlos Ramos at the 2018 US Open final won by Naomi Osaka continues to be one of the most divisive topics in the sporting world.

Williams was ultimately hit with a game penalty for a series of code violations — sparked by the moment she was reprimanded for receiving instructions from coach Patrick Mouratoglou during the final.

A statistical analysis of crime and punishment of male and female players at grand slam tournaments, published in the New York Times over the weekend, showed male players are actually punished much more frequently than their WTA Tour counterparts.

The figures published by The Times shows since 1998 male players were fined for code of conduct breaches 1517 times compared to the 535 times female players were penalised.

The article did not make any conclusions surrounding Williams’ claim that she was penalised for verbal abuse only because she is a woman.

The article’s biggest find was that women at grand slams have been fined for coaching 152 times, almost double the 87 fines handed out to male players for the same offence.

What caused the whole bother.
What caused the whole bother.Source:AP

The figures obtained show that men received 649 fines for breaking racquets to 99 for women in tens of thousands of matches in the four Grand Slams over the last two decades.

Men were fined 344 times compared to 140 for “audible obscenity” and 287 to 67 for unsportsmanlike conduct.

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